MAPC Completes Global Wind Organization (GWO) Training for Offshore Wind Field Team

A team of engineers and technicians from Maritime Applied Physics Corporation (MAPC) recently completed Global Wind Organization (GWO) Basic Safety Training with Sea Survival and Transfer modules at Falck Safety Services, Teesside, United Kingdom.

This GWO training is the accepted industry standard for accessing offshore wind turbines, met masts, transformers, and buoys. It includes tower climbing, advanced first aid training, and fire suppression training.

Maryland’s Department of Labor Licensing and Regulation (DLLR) Maryland Business Works training assistance program provided 50% matching funds to assist MAPC in providing this training to its employees. MAPC has won a Maryland wind energy area met mast outfitting contract with US Wind, Inc., one of Maryland’s two offshore wind developers, and plans to use this training in order to support the contract. 

Mark Rice, President and Founder of MAPC: “Global Wind Organization training is not currently available in the United States, so leveraging the lessons learned from Europe ensures our personnel are well prepared to handle the unique demands of offshore wind tower climbing.”

With a track record of innovative and challenging projects in the maritime sector, MAPC is well equipped to support the emerging U.S. offshore wind industry.

MAPC has obtained a sublicense from Blount Boats to build South Boats’ licensed Crew Transfer Vessels, and seeks to provide outfitting, commissioning and O&M services for site assessments, turbine transition, and balance-of-plant systems.  MAPC’s supplier network and capabilities include instrumentation and data acquisition systems, solar and wind power systems, collision avoidance lighting and signals, davits, and fall and fire safety systems.

MAPC will be presenting TALONS at MACC on Thursday, July 19th! Will we see you there?

MAPC is honored to have our white paper on the TALONS tethered parafoil system accepted into ASNE’s Multi-Agency Craft Conference. TALONS Program Manager, Kevin Silbert, will be presenting the TALONS system for extension of Unmanned Surface Vessel command and control on Thursday at 11a.m. at the Boats and Crafts Port Tent! We look forward to seeing you there. Here’s a sneak peak at one of MAPC’s presentation slides:








Designing Sikorsky’s MH-60R Life Raft Pod

Brunswick, Maine
November, 2017

Sikorsky was tasked by an international naval customer to provide an External Life Raft Pod (ELRP) for its MH-60R helicopters that could manually or automatically deploy under the toughest weather conditions, and to be easily operated with limited dexterity in a thick survival suit and gloves in cold water conditions. Maritime Applied Physics Corporation (MAPC) designed and manufactured the ELRPs to meet those engineering challenges. After a rigorous testing program, Sikorsky’s ELRP is now available as an option for the international customer’s MH-60R and can be qualified for other H-60 helicopters.

The ELRP can be jettisoned from up to 50 feet altitude at 60 knots of forward velocity, and deploys a TSO C70a Type 1 compliant cold weather six-person life raft and survival kit. In an aircraft ditching scenario, the ELRP automatically deploys and floats to the surface for access by survivors. The pod remains sealed until manual actuation of large orange manual release handles, and is buoyant both before and after deployment. Automatically activated LED strobe locator lights are visible for over three miles and are designed to strobe continuously for 12 hours.

To perform in this aerospace program, MAPC’s Brunswick, Maine office became AS9100 compliant. Please see Specification Sheet for more information.

TALONS: “Exceeding Expectations” on the USS Zephyr

August 15, 2017:  DARPA released a new press release and video about TALONS’ recent demonstration on the USS Zephyr.  For more information about MAPC’s work on the TALONS system, please visit our site!

From the DARPA Press Release:

TALONS Tested on Commissioned U.S. Navy Vessel for First Time

Prototype of low-cost, elevated sensor mast improves ship’s communication range and ability to detect, track, and classify contacts of interest

Image Caption: DARPA’s Towed Airborne Lift of Naval Systems (TALONS) research effort recently demonstrated its prototype of a low-cost, elevated sensor mast aboard a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel for the first time. The crew of USS Zephyr, a Cyclone-class patrol coastal ship, evaluated the technology demonstration system over three days near Naval Station Mayport, Florida. Click below for high-resolution image.

DARPA’s Towed Airborne Lift of Naval Systems (TALONS) research effort recently demonstrated its prototype of a low-cost, elevated sensor mast aboard a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel for the first time. The crew of USS Zephyr, a 174-foot (53-meter) Cyclone-class patrol coastal ship, evaluated the technology demonstration system over three days near Naval Station Mayport, Florida.

TALONS demonstrated safe and routine operation from the ship’s deck under a variety of sea states and wind conditions without adversely affecting the ship’s operational capability. In tests, the system significantly improved the ship’s ability to detect, track, and classify contacts of interest. It also increased communications range between the ship and remote platforms such as the Zephyr’s rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs).

Towed behind boats or ships, TALONS could persistently suspend intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR) instruments and communications payloads of up to 150 pounds at altitudes between 500 and 1,500 feet above sea level—many times higher than current ships’ masts—greatly extending the equipment’s range and effectiveness.

“We’re very pleased with the USS Zephyr testing, which showed that a future system based on TALONS could provide operational benefits for even small Navy vessels,” said Scott Littlefield, a program manager in DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office (TTO). “In the next year, we will continue our cooperative relationship with the U.S. Navy and work toward fully automating launch and recovery, which would make the system even easier to use on manned vessels and compatible with unmanned surface vessels.”

“Expectations were really exceeded with the ease of not only deployment, but the recovery of the system,” said Lt. Cmdr. Cameron Ingram, commanding officer of the Zephyr. “Beyond the initial launch, it immediately stabilized, and it had a very smooth transition all the way up to altitude. I was very impressed with how stable it was.”

The TALONS test on USS Zephyr built upon a successful joint test last year with DARPA’s Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel (ACTUV) program. ACTUV’s technology demonstration vessel set sail with TALONS as its first payload as part of open-water testing off the coast of California.

TALONS is part of DARPA’s Phase 1 research for Tern, a joint program between DARPA and the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR).

Image Caption: DARPA’s Towed Airborne Lift of Naval Systems (TALONS) research effort recently demonstrated its prototype of a low-cost, elevated sensor mast aboard a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel for the first time. The crew of USS Zephyr, a Cyclone-class patrol coastal ship, evaluated the technology demonstration system over three days near Naval Station Mayport, Florida. Click below for high-resolution image.
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