MAPC will be presenting TALONS at MACC on Thursday, July 19th! Will we see you there?

MAPC is honored to have our white paper on the TALONS tethered parafoil system accepted into ASNE’s Multi-Agency Craft Conference. TALONS Program Manager, Kevin Silbert, will be presenting the TALONS system for extension of Unmanned Surface Vessel command and control on Thursday at 11a.m. at the Boats and Crafts Port Tent! We look forward to seeing you there. Here’s a sneak peak at one of MAPC’s presentation slides:








MAPC’s Latest Engineering Success

***FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***

MAPC’s latest engineering success:

The Remote Off-Shore Sensor System


Baltimore, Maryland: Maritime Applied Physics Corporation successfully completed a recent demonstration of its latest maritime engineering platform: the Remote Off-Shore Sensor System, or ROSS buoy. The ROSS buoy is an unmanned platform designed to easily integrate multiple sensors in order to provide air, surface, and subsea maritime domain awareness in real-time by leveraging onboard line-of-sight and over the horizon communications links.

The ROSS buoy, unlike traditional buoy designs, has a patent-pending passively stabilized gimbaled mast that can extend 24 feet. Paul Seiffert, Senior Engineer at MAPC, explained: “The stabilized mast provides low motions in high sea states so data from sensors like cameras and radar are always crystal clear. It’s also much easier and more cost effective to deploy compared to a spar buoy.” The ROSS buoy was deployed for two weeks in May BuoyOceansday2015 for a major military exercise.

Maritime Applied Physics Corporation has been marketing the ROSS to the off-shore wind industry which is required to conduct marine mammal, avian and wind profile surveys in advance of constructing any permanent structures in the seafloor. Much less expensive than a traditional MET tower, the ROSS buoy also has very little environmental impact as a moored floating platform. The ROSS can run for over 30 days (at full power) without refueling, using its hybrid-electric power system, and allows for quiet periods while listening for marine mammals during critical times.

Our partners, Persistent Systems Wave Relay, L-3 Integrated Sensor Systems, and Accipiter Avian Radar Monitoring, and marine mammal subsurface sensors can all be simultaneously integrated into the ROSS because of its large pay-load capacity. Seiffert went on to say; “The ROSS buoy illustrates the type of work that we do best as a company: easily deployed, highly advanced engineering platforms that can endure the toughest maritime conditions.”

Buoy5.12.15

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DARPA publicly releases information on one of MAPC’s projects: TALONS

Friday, May 8, 2015:  DARPA released information about two exciting projects under its TERN program (Tactically  Exploited  Reconnaissance Node).  The TALONS program mentioned is  led by MAPC.
TALONSphoto
The full press release from DARPA can be found here: http://www.darpa.mil/NewsEvents/Releases/2015/05/07.aspx

The Washington Business Journal share’s DARPA’s enthusiasm for  TALONS,  stating that the TERN program is one of DARPA’s “coolest” projects.  Read the full article here: http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/blog/fedbiz_daily/2015/05/drones-at-sea-here-s-the-latest-from-one-of-darpa.html

MAPC Launch and Recovery At Sea, Air, Space, 2015

National Harbor, MD:  MAPC’s Launch and Recovery System on the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 2 and LCS4 were featured during a demonstration by Cubic Global Defense Corporation at the Sea, Air, Space 2015 conference this year.

MAPC employees were on hand to test out the training system and were able to successfully tow the RMMV back into the LCS.

Check out the video below of an MAPC employee virtually training on our Launch and Recovery System at the Conference!

GARC: The First Military Rescue Mission

OKINAWA, Japan: On October 5, 2014 three airmen working at the Kadena Air Force Base were swept into the sea during Typhoon Phanfone, a category-4 storm with winds reaching 150 miles an hour and estimated 15-30 foot high waves.

A joint rescue mission, launched by the 31st Air Rescue Squadron stationed at Kadena and the 11th Division of the Japanese Coast Guard and local fire department, began shortly thereafter, deploying two GARCs and six jetskis. Within hours, however, the jetskis were disabled, unable to handle the waves and the breaking surf; some with water jets clogged due to debris floating in the water.

The GARC, a personal watercraft rescue boat, designed for durability in breaking surf and high waves, not only outperformed the six jetskis in this mission, but rescued one of the jetski operators after a particularly big wave hit the jetski. Although the same wave hit the GARC broadside, it did not capsize. 

The 143 horse power GARCs worked for three days in up to 30 foot waves, with a payload of 2-3 Airforce Pararescue Specialists (known as PJs) per GARC.  The boats only required refueling once per each 12 hour day at sea.
Maritime Applied Physics Corporation (MAPC) has now developed a line of manned and unmanned, gas, diesel, and electric 3.6 and 5 meter GARCs that are stable, dependable, durable, and can turn completely around within one boat length. Mark Rice, President and Founder of MAPC: “The October rescue and recovery mission in Okinawa proves the GARC’s durability and reliability in extreme weather conditions.” For more information on the GARC, please check out our website: http://www.mapcorp.com/our-work/garc/